Origin And Danger Of Fractional-Reserve Banking

If there is any one thing in particular that threatens the collapse of our banking system and financial structures worldwide, it is the practice of fractional-reserve banking. The subject is rarely mentioned in the financial press. When it is mentioned, a clear explanation is usually not available.  Continue reading “Origin And Danger Of Fractional-Reserve Banking”

Mansa Musa, Gold, And Inflation

From Wikipedia…

 Musa Keita I (c. 1280 – c. 1337) was the tenth Mansa, which translates as           “sultan” (king) or “emperor”, of the wealthy West African Mali Empire. 

During his reign Mali may have been the largest producer of gold in the world at a point of exceptional demand. One of the richest people in history, he is known to have been enormously wealthy; reported as being inconceivably rich by contemporaries, “There’s really no way to put an accurate number on his wealth” (Davidson 2015).  Continue reading “Mansa Musa, Gold, And Inflation”

Inflation – What It Is, What It Isn’t, And Who’s Responsible For It

Inflation is the debasement of money by the government. PERIOD.

It is NOT an increase in the general level of prices for goods and services.

The above statements are critical to an understanding and correct interpretation of events which are happening today – or expected to happen  – that are casually attributable to inflation.  So, let’s go one step further.

There is only one cause of inflation: government.  The term government also includes central banks, especially the US Federal Reserve Bank. Continue reading “Inflation – What It Is, What It Isn’t, And Who’s Responsible For It”

A Loaf Of Bread, A Gallon Of Gas, An Ounce Of Gold

The average cost for a loaf of bread in 1930 was ten cents ($.10). The average cost for a gallon of gasoline was also ten cents.  With gold priced in U.S. dollars at $20.00 to the ounce, you could at that time purchase two hundred loaves of bread or two hundred gallons of gasoline (or some combination thereof).  Twenty dollars of paper currency OR one ounce of gold valued at $20.00, usually in the form of a U.S. Double Eagle ($20.00 gold coin, legal tender), were equal in “purchasing power”. Continue reading “A Loaf Of Bread, A Gallon Of Gas, An Ounce Of Gold”